6 Social Networks to Leverage in Your Job Search

July 16, 2012

Social networks offer benefits and opportunities that job seekers can leverage during the job search. Does that mean that you should have a profile on all of them? If you’re so inclined, sure! But you can also select the networks that make the most sense for you and your industry.

To help you determine which network is right for you, here is our overview of the 6 most popular social networks and their specific benefits:

1. LinkedIn
According to a new Jobvite survey, LinkedIn remains the dominant recruiting network, used by 93% of the respondents. Employers worldwide are on the site, and you may link with them directly by building a profile that outlines your experience. Showcasing your skills and talents on LinkedIn will help the right people and opportunities find their way to you.

Tip: Keep your profile up-to-date with your latest work information. Don’t forget to include a well-written summary that holds keywords and touches on your experience, interests, and goals.

2. Twitter
Twitter can be overwhelming for first-timers, but, with a little bit of patience, you can build a great network and connect with industry leaders or recruiters. You’ll have the opportunity to show them just how interested people are in what you have to say, and they will learn about your status in the industry. It can also increase your visibility and add to your credibility as a professional.

Tip: Use websites like WeFollow.com and Twellow.com to identify key influencers and industry leaders.  Once you follow them, listen and learn!

3. Facebook
What recruiters and employers like about Facebook is that it bridges the gap between personal and professional life. Image is everything. Your Facebook profile displays your personality and employers can better determine how you’ll fit into the company culture. Make your profile authentic, and showcase your ideal image. For more information check out our previous blog post on Facebook’s importance in the job search.

Tip: Make use of job searching apps like BranchOut and BeKnown to target your job search. ‘Like’ companies that interest you, and engage in conversation on their page. It’s a great way to connect with potential employers.

4. Pinterest
What better way to show off your newest design, or the delicious dishes you cooked up in your kitchen? If you are an aspiring artist or a chef in the making, Pinterest is A MUST for you! Photo sharing is one of the most popular features of social networks, so use Pinterest as a portfolio of your work.

Tip: In lieu of, or in addition to, posting a regular written resume, use Pinterest as a way to create a visual representation of your resume or professional experience. Create boards for your work experience, awards and accomplishments, degrees or classes, a portfolio of your work, and even your hobbies and interests. (Click here to see how it’s done!)

5. YouTube
Yet another great network for a creative professional! You can utilize YouTube to create a more effective and interactive online experience for employers, rather than just falling back on the good old resume.

Tip: Thinking about a video resume? Keep it short, a minute or two, and explain your background in a story-like fashion. Also specify why you are the best person for this job and what value you would bring to this organization with the skills you possess.

6. Google+
Google+ has established itself as a social network for people that are interested in the tech industry, including early adopters, social influencers and tech innovators. It’s a great place to showcase expertise and learn from others. And since Google controls much of search traffic, your Google+ profile will be found more easily, adding extra value to this relatively new network.

Tip: Google+ Sparks are topics you might be interested in, and a good way to keep track of what’s happening in your industry. Search by keyword to find news and information, and save your searches, which will then show up under Sparks on your profile page for quick access.

Any other social networks you’ve had success with during your job search? Do tell!


Google Launches New Privacy Tool, Me on the Web

June 17, 2011

At Reppler, we currently focus on monitoring social networks and Facebook in particular, but since we recognize that there may be other, possibly damaging information to be found via search engines, we want to give you a heads up about a new Google privacy tool that assists you with monitoring other web content. Designed to help users protect online privacy and identity, the new tool, Me on the Web, is easily accessible on the Google Dashboard and encourages you to keep track of your personal information as it appears on the web. While Google Alerts already enables users to receive notification whenever their name is mentioned online, the new tool provides additional links to resources about how to protect personal information online and remove unwanted information.

Already existing Google tools make it possible for users to post or search online under a pseudonym, but damage to your reputation often originates from outside sources. As Google states in their Me on the Web announcement,

Your online identity is determined not only by what you post, but also by what others post about you — whether a mention in a blog post, a photo tag or a reply to a public status update.

With an incredible boom in social networking sites, it is alarmingly easy to lose track of any personal information that is spreading through the web. Privacy and online reputation management has become a major issue in recent years, not just in the US, but worldwide. The recent and somewhat extreme case of Gennette Cordova serves as a chilling example for how fast social networking can get out of control and have a serious impact on your reputation and your privacy. Overnight, her name and personal information were displayed all over the web as she got caught up in the scandal over Representative Anthony Weiner’s photographs. So if you want to control how you are being perceived in content that can be found through Google, the Me on the Web tool may be a good start.